The Confluence Trail

This shady 1.5-mile trail hugs the South Fork before curving underneath I-85, Ga. 400 and the Buford Highway Connector. Where privet, vines, weeds and underbrush once choked the Confluence Trail, there are now hardwoods, pines and newly-planted native species. Deer, otter, beavers, songbirds, geese, ducks, fox and muskrat sightings confirm that our hard work to restore the creek is working. It currently ends where the North and South Forks come together to firm Peachtree Creek. We are currently working to connect this natural paradise to the heart of Buckhead. 

The sandy banks of the South Fork greet visitors who will pass under the interstate on the right before reaching the confluence where Peachtree Creek begins. 

The sandy banks of the South Fork greet visitors who will pass under the interstate on the right before reaching the confluence where Peachtree Creek begins. 

The Confluence Trail goes underneath I-85, Ga. 400 and the Buford Highway Connector, giving an amazing view of urban infrastructure.

The Confluence Trail goes underneath I-85, Ga. 400 and the Buford Highway Connector, giving an amazing view of urban infrastructure.

The North Fork (left) joins with the South Fork (far right) to form Peachtree Creek (near right) at the confluence. 

The North Fork (left) joins with the South Fork (far right) to form Peachtree Creek (near right) at the confluence. 

Parking

On-street parking for the trail is available at the cul-de-sac at 2100 Armand Rd. The trailhead starts just past Cedar Chase's private property sign on the left hand side of their driveway off of the cul-de-sac. (Please do not park on Cedar Chase property.) 

History

“We used to walk on the trail before any work was done,” recalls Donna Davis, president of the Cedar Chase Condominium Association. “It was a wild tangle of underbrush and we didn’t have any way to restore the canopy.”

Thanks to Trees Atlanta and dedicated South Fork volunteers, this is no longer the case. Where invasive privet and vines once reigned, now young native trees point skyward.  In the fall of 2013, we planted $10,000 worth of saplings on the Confluence Trail, courtesy of NASCAR and CSX grants.

“This work has changed things on the trail,” says Donna. “It creates a promise where before there was a hope, and you can really see something happening. Now whenever I go down, I always see people- before the restoration, you didn’t really. Now they are going because it’s a semi-managed area while also being a natural green space in the city."

Chestnut Restoration

The Confluence Trail is the site of our efforts to reintroduce the American Chestnut tree, which went extinct due to the Asian Chestnut blight. Click here to read more.